Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF CERVANTES
AND HIS TIMES
1547 Miguel de Cervantes born in Alcalá de Henares, probably on 29
September, third child of Rodrigo de Cervantes, a surgeon, and
Leonor de Cortinas; baptized on 9 October.
1554 Lazarillo de Tormes.
1556 Abdication of Charles V and accession of Philip II.
1558 Accession of Elizabeth I of England.
1561 Madrid becomes the seat of the court and capital of Spain.
1562 Birth of Lope de Vega.
1563 End of the Council of Trent.
1564 Birth of Shakespeare.
1565 Revolt of the Low Countries.
1566 Rodrigo de Cervantes moves to Madrid, after living in different
Spanish cities over the years.
1567 First poems of Miguel de Cervantes.
1568 Cervantes studying at the Estudio de la Villa, Madrid, directed
by the Erasmian humanist scholar Juan López de Hoyos.
1569 A warrant issued for the arrest of one Miguel de Cervantes
(identification uncertain) for wounding an opponent in a duel;
December, Cervantes in Rome.
1570 In the service of Cardinal Acquaviva, Rome.
1571 Combined fleets of Venice, the Papacy, and Spain under Don
Juan of Austria defeat the Turkish fleet at the Battle of Lepanto;
Cervantes, serving as a soldier, is wounded and loses the use of
his left hand.
1572-3 Present on expeditions to Navarino and Tunis.
1575 On route to Spain, the galley in which he is travelling is seized
by the Corsair Arnaut Mami; taken captive to Algiers.
1576-9 Makes four unsuccessful attempts to escape, for which he goes
unpunished.
1580 When about to be transported to Constantinople, he is ransomed
by the Trinitarian friars; December, back in Madrid; Philip II
annexes Portugal.
1581 Sent on official mission to Oran and returns via Lisbon.

-xxi-

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