Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

breeze; and the landlord brought him some of the ill-watered and worse-boiled 'baccalao', and a loaf of bread as black and mouldy as his armour: but it was a matter of great laughter to see him eat; for, having his helmet on, and the beaver up, he could not put anything into his mouth with his own hands, but somebody must do it for him; and so one of the aforesaid ladies performed this office. But to give him to drink was utterly impossible, if the host had not bored a reed, and, putting one end into his mouth, poured in the wine leisurely at the other: and all this he suffered patiently rather than cut the lacings of his helmet.

In the meantime there came to the inn a sowgelder, who, as soon as he arrived, sounded his whistle of reeds four or five times; which entirely confirmed Don Quixote in the thought, that he was in some famous castle, that they served him with music, and that the poorjacks were trouts, the coarse loaf the finest white bread, the wenches ladies, and the host governor of the castle; and so he concluded his resolution to be well taken, and his sally attended with success. But what gave him the most disturbance was, that he was not yet dubbed a knight; thinking he could not lawfully undertake any adventure until he had first received the order of knighthood.


CHAPTER 3
In which is related the pleasant method Don Quixote took to be dubbed a knight.

AND now, being disturbed with this thought, he made an abrupt end of his short supper; which done, he called the landlord, and, shutting himself up with him in the stable, he fell upon his knees before him, and said:

'I will never rise from this place, valorous knight, until your courtesy vouchsafes me a boon I mean to beg of you; which will redound to your own honour, and to the benefit of human kind.'

The host, seeing his guest at his feet, and hearing such expressions, stood confounded, gazing at him, and not knowing what to do or say: he then strove to raise him from the ground, but in vain, until he had promised to grant him the boon he requested.

'I expected no less, Sir, from your great magnificence,' answered

-31-

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