Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; E. C. Riley et al. | Go to book overview

Urgada,* we shall find a way to cure you ourselves. Cursed, say I again, and a hundred times cursed, be those books of knighterrantry that have brought your worship to this pass.'

They carried him presently to his chamber, and searching for his wounds, they found none at all: and he told them he was only bruised by a great fall he got with his horse Rosinante, as he was fighting with ten of the most prodigious and audacious giants that were to be found on the earth.

'Ho, ho,' says the priest, 'what! there are giants too in the dance? By my faith, I shall set fire to them all before to-morrow night.'

They asked Don Quixote a thousand questions, and he would answer nothing, but only desired something to eat, and that they would let him sleep, which was what he stood most in need of. They did so, and the priest inquired particularly of the countryman in what condition he had found Don Quixote; who gave him an account of the whole, with the extravagances he had uttered, both at the time of finding him and all the way home; which increased the Licentiate's desire to do what he did the next day, which was to call on his friend, master Nicholas the barber, with whom he came to Don Quixote's house.


CHAPTER 6
Of the pleasant and grand scrutiny made by the priest and the barber in our ingenious gentleman's library.

WHILST Don Quixote still slept on, the priest asked the niece for the keys of the chamber where the books were, those authors of the mischief, and she delivered them with a very good will. They all went in, and the housekeeper with them. They found above a hundred volumes in folio, very well bound, besides a great many small ones. And no sooner did the housekeeper see them, than she ran out of the room in great haste, and immediately returned with a pot of holy water and a bunch of hyssop, and said:

'Señor Licentiate, take this and sprinkle the room, lest some enchanter, of the many these books abound with, should enchant us in revenge for what we intend to do, in banishing them out of the world.'

-47-

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