Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

The terrified and disconsolate lady, without considering what Don Quixote required, and without inquiring who Dulcinea was, promised him her squire should perform whatever he enjoined him.

'In reliance upon this promise,' said Don Quixote, 'I will do him no further hurt, though he has well deserved it at my hands.'


CHAPTER 10
Of the discourse Don Quixote had* with his good squire Sancho Panza.

BY this time Sancho Panza had got upon his legs, somewhat roughly handled by the monk's lackeys, and stood beholding very attentively the combat of his master Don Quixote, and besought God in his heart that he would be pleased to give him the victory, and that he might thereby win some island, of which to make him governor, as he had promised him. Now, seeing the conflict at an end, and that his master was ready to mount again upon Rosinante, he came and held his stirrup; and before he got up, he fell upon his knees before him, and, taking hold of his hand, kissed it, and said to him:

'Be pleased, my lord Don Quixote, to bestow upon me the government of that island, which you have won in this rigorous combat; for, be it never so big, I find in myself ability sufficient to govern it, as well as the best that ever governed an island in the world.'

To which Don Quixote answered:

'Consider, brother Sancho, that this adventure, and others of this nature, are not adventures of islands, but of crossways, in which nothing is to be gotten but a broken head, or the loss of an ear. Have patience; for adventures will offer, whereby I may not only make thee a governor, but something better.'

Sancho returned him abundance of thanks, and kissing his hand again, and the skirt of his coat of mail, he helped him to get upon Rosinante, and himself mounting his ass, began to follow his master; who going off at a round rate, without taking his leave, or speaking to those of the coach, entered into a wood that was hard by. Sancho followed him as fast as his beast could trot; but Rosinante made such way, that, seeing himself like to be left behind, he was forced to call aloud to his master to stay for him. Don Quixote did so, checking

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