Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; E. C. Riley et al. | Go to book overview

and sending up his complaints to all-pitying heaven. In the meantime, the beautiful Marcela, free and unconcerned, triumphs over them all.

'We who know her, wait with impatience to see what her haughtiness will come to, and who is to be the happy man that shall subdue so intractable a disposition, and enjoy so incomparable a beauty. All that I have recounted being so assured a truth, I the more easily believe what our companion told us concerning the cause of Chrysostom's death. And therefore I advise you, sir, that you do not fail tomorrow to be at his funeral, which will be very well worth seeing: for Chrysostom has a great many friends; and it is not half a league from this place to that where he ordered himself to be buried.'

'I will certainly be there,' said Don Quixote, 'and I thank you for the pleasure you have given me by the recital of so entertaining a story.'

'Oh!' replied the goatherd, 'I do not yet know half the adventures that have happened to Marcela's lovers; but to-morrow, perhaps, we shall meet by the way with some shepherd, who may tell us more: at present it will not be amiss, that you get you to sleep under some roof, for the cold dew of the night may do your wound harm, though the salve I have put to it is such, that you need not fear any cross accident.'

Sancho Panza, who, for his part, gave this long-winded tale of the goatherd's to the devil, pressed his master to lay himself down to sleep in Pedro's hut. He did so, and passed the rest of the night in remembrances of his lady Dulcinea, in imitation of Marcela's lovers. Sancho Panza took up his lodging between Rosinante and his ass, and slept it out, not like a discarded lover, but like a person well rib-roasted.


CHAPTER 13
The conclusion of the story of the shepherdess Marcela, with other incidents.

BUT scarcely had the day began to discover itself through the balconies of the east, when five of the six goatherds got up, and went to awake Don Quixote, and asked him, whether he continued in his

-87-

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