Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

lowed and persecuted, she ought to be honoured and esteemed by all good men in the world, for being the only woman in it whose intentions are so virtuous.'

Now, whether it were through Don Quixote's menaces, or because Ambrosio desired them to finish that last office to his friend, none of the shepherds stirred from thence, until, the grave being made, and Chrysostom's papers burnt, they laid his body in it, not without many tears of the bystanders. They closed the sepulchre with a large fragment of a rock, until a tombstone could be finished, which, Ambrosio said, he intended to have made, with an epitaph after this manner:

Here lies a gentle shepherd swain,
Through cold neglect untimely slain.
By rigour's cruel hand he died,
A victim to the scorn and pride
Of a coy, beautiful ingrate,
Whose eyes enlarge love's tyrant state.

Then they strewed abundance of flowers and boughs on the grave, and condoling with his friend Ambrosio, took leave and departed. Vivaldo and his companion did the same; and Don Quixote bade adieu to his hosts and the travellers, who entreated him to accompany them to Seville, that being a place the most likely to furnish him with adventures, since, in every street, and at every turning, more were to be met with there, than in any other place whatever. Don Quixote thanked them for the notice they gave him, and the disposition they showed to do him a courtesy, and said, that for the present he could not, and ought not to go to Seville, until he had cleared all those mountains of robbers and assassins of which, it was reported, they were full. The travellers seeing his good intention, would not importune him farther; but taking leave again, left him, and pursued their journey: in which they wanted not a subject for discourse, as well of the story of Marcela and Chrysostom, as of the madness of Don Quixote, who resolved to go in quest of the shepherdess Marcela, and offer her all that was in his power for her service. But it fell not out as he intended, as is related in the progress of this true history, the second part ending here.*

-103-

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