Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

many grinders I want on the right side of my upper jaw; for there I feel the pain.'

Sancho put in his fingers, and, feeling about, said:

'How many did your worship use to have on this side?'

'Four,' answered Don Quixote, 'beside the eye-tooth, all whole, and very sound.'

'Take care what you say, Sir,' answered Sancho.

'I say four, if not five,' replied Don Quixote; 'for in my whole life I never drew tooth nor grinder, nor have I lost one by rheum or decay.'

'Well then,' said Sancho, 'on this lower side, your worship has but two grinders and a half, and in the upper, neither half nor whole; all is as smooth and even as the palm of my hand.'

'Unfortunate that I am!' said Don Quixote, hearing the sad news his squire told him; 'I had rather they had torn off an arm, provided it were not the sword arm; for, Sancho, you must know, that a mouth without grinders, is like a mill without a stone; and a diamond is not so precious as a tooth. But all this we are subject to who profess the strict order of chivalry. Mount, friend Sancho, and lead on; for I will follow thee what pace thou wilt.'

Sancho did so, and went toward the place where he thought to find a lodging, without going out of the high road, which was thereabouts very much frequented. As they thus went on, fair and softly (for the pain of Don Quixote's jaws gave him no ease, nor inclination to make haste), Sancho had a mind to amuse and divert him by talking to him, and said, among other things, what you will find written in the following chapter.


CHAPTER 19
Of the sage discourse that passed between Sancho and his master, and the succeeding adventure of the dead body; with other famous occurrences.

'IT is my opinion, master of mine, that all the disadventures which have befallen us of late, are doubtless in punishment of the sin committed by your worship against your own order of knighthood, in not performing the oath you took, not to eat bread on a table-cloth, nor solace yourself with the queen, with all the rest that you swore to

-134-

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