Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; E. C. Riley et al. | Go to book overview

beholding him, as if to see whether he knew him; in no less admiration, perhaps, at the figure, mien, and armour, of Don Quixote, than Don Quixote was at the sight of him. In short, the first who spoke after the embracing was the Ragged Knight, and he said what shall be told in the next chapter.


CHAPTER 24
A continuation of the adventure of the Sierra Morena.

THE history relates, that great was the attention wherewith Don Quixote listened to the Ragged Knight of the mountain, who began his discourse thus:

'Assuredly, señor, whoever you are (for I do not know you), I am obliged to you for your expressions of civility to me; and I wish it were in my power to serve you with more than my bare goodwill, for the kind reception you have given me; but my fortune allows me nothing but good wishes to return you, for your kind intentions towards me.'

'Mine,' answered Don Quixote, 'are to serve you, inasmuch that I determined not to quit these mountains until I had found you, and learned from your own mouth, whether the affliction, which, by your leading this strange life, seems to possess you, may admit of any remedy, and, if need were, to use all possible diligence to compass it; and though your misfortune were of that sort which keeps the door locked against all kind of comfort, I intended to assist you in bewailing and bemoaning it the best I could; for it is some relief in misfortunes to find those who pity them. And if you think my intention deserves to be taken kindly, and with any degree of acknowledgement, I beseech you, Sir, by the abundance of civility I see you are possessed of; I conjure you also by whatever in this life you have loved, or do love most, to tell me who you are, and what has brought you hither, to live and die like a brute beast, amidst these solitudes; as you seem to intend, by frequenting them in a manner so unbecoming of yourself, if I may judge by your person, and what remains of your attire. And I swear' (added Don Quixote) 'by the order of knighthood I have received, though unworthy and a sinner, and by the profession of a knight-errant, if you gratify me in this, to serve

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