Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

out, and afterwards he would tell them the reason why he did not, nor was it convenient for him to go in; but he prayed them to bring him out something to eat that was warm, and also some barley for Rosinante. They went in, and left him, and soon after the barber brought him out some meat.

Then they two having laid their heads together how to bring about their design, the priest bethought him of a device exactly fitted to Don Quixote's humour, and likely to effect what they desired. Which was, as he told the barber, that he designed to put himself into the habit of a damsel-errant, and would have him to equip himself, the best he could, so as to pass for his squire; and that in this disguise they should go to the place where Don Quixote was; and himself, pretending to be an afflicted damsel, and in distress, would beg a boon of him, which he, as a valorous knight-errant, could not choose but vouchsafe; and that the boon he intended to beg, was, that he would go with her whither she should carry him, to redress an injury done her by a discourteous knight, entreating him, at the same time, that he would not desire her to take off her mask, nor inquire anything further concerning her, until he had done her justice on that wicked knight; and he made no doubt but that Don Quixote would, by these means, be brought to do whatever they desired of him, and so they should bring him away from that place, and carry him to his village, where they would endeavour to find some remedy for his unaccountable madness.


CHAPTER 27 .
How the priest and the barber put their design in execution with other matters worthy to be recited in this history

THE barber liked the priest's contrivance so well, that it was immediately put in execution. They borrowed of the landlady a petticoat and head-dress, leaving a new cassock of the priest's in pawn for them. The barber made himself a huge beard of the sorrel tail of a pied ox, in which the innkeeper used to hang his comb. The hostess asked them, why they desired those things? The priest gave them a brief account of Don Quixote's madness, and how necessary that disguise was, in order to get him from the mountain where he

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