Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

you to know, friend, that we squires to knights-errant are subject to much hunger, and to ill luck, and to other things too, which are more easily conceived than told.'

Andres laid hold on the bread and cheese, and, seeing that nobody else gave him anything, he made his bow, and marched off.

'It is true,' he said, at parting, to Don Quixote: 'For the love of God, Señor Knight-errant, if ever you meet me again, though you see they are beating me to pieces, do not succour nor assist me, but leave me to my misfortune, which cannot be so great, but a greater will follow from your worship's aid, whom may the curse of God light upon, and upon all the knights-errant that ever were born in the world.'

Don Quixote was getting up to chastise him; but he fell a-running so fast, that nobody offered to pursue him. Don Quixote was mightily abashed at Andres's story: and the rest were forced to refrain, though with some difficulty, from laughing, that they might not put him quite out of countenance.


CHAPTER 32
Which treats of what befell Don Quixote's whole company in the inn.

THE notable repast being ended, they saddled immediately, and, without anything happening to them worthy to be related, they arrived the next day at the inn, that dread and terror of Sancho Panza, who, though he would fain have declined going in, could not avoid it. The hostess, the host, their daughter, and Maritornes, seeing Don Quixote and Sancho coming, went out to meet them, with signs of much joy; and he received them with a grave deportment, and a nod of approbation, bidding them prepare him a better bed than they had done the time before: to which the hostess answered, that, provided he would pay better than the time before, she would get him a bed for a prince. Don Quixote said he would; and so they made him a tolerable one in the same large room where he had lain before: and he immediately threw himself down upon it; for he arrived very much shattered both in body and brains. He was no sooner shut into his chamber, but the hostess fell upon the barber, and taking him by the beard, said:

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