Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

immediately went to seek Lothario; and, having found him, it is impossible to recount the embraces he gave him, the satisfaction he expressed, and the praises he bestowed on Camilla. All which Lothario hearkened to, without being able to show any signs of joy; for he could not but reflect how much his friend was deceived, and how ungenerously he treated him. And though Anselmo perceived that Lothario did not express any joy, he believed it was because Camilla was wounded, and he had been the occasion of it. And therefore, among other things, he desired him to be in no pain about Camilla: for, without doubt, the wound must be very slight, since her maid and she had agreed to hide it from him: and as he might depend upon it there was nothing to be feared, he desired that thenceforward he would rejoice and be merry with him, since, through his diligence, and by his means, he found himself raised to the highest pitch of happiness he could wish to arrive at; and, for himself, he said, he would make it his pastime and amusement to write verses in praise of Camilla, to perpetuate her memory to all future ages. Lothario applauded his good resolution, and said, that he too would lend a helping hand towards raising so illustrious an edifice.

Anselmo now remained the man of [all] the world the most agreeably deceived. He led home by the hand the instrument, as he thought, of his glory, but in reality the ruin of his fame. Camilla received Lothario with a countenance seemingly shy, but with inward gladness of heart. This imposture lasted some time, until, a few months after, fortune turned her wheel, and the iniquity, until then so artfully concealed, came to light, and his impertinent curiosity cost poor Anselmo his life.


CHAPTER 35
The conclusion of 'The Novel of the Curious Impertinent', with the dreadful battle betwixt Don Quixote and certain wine-skins.*

THERE remained but little more of the novel to be read, when from the room, where Don Quixote lay, Sancho Panza came running out all in a fright, crying aloud:

'Run, sirs, quickly, and succour my master, who is over head and ears in the toughest and closest battle my eyes have ever beheld. As God shall save me, he has given the giant, that enemy of the princess

-313-

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