Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

to remain there all her days, unless she could spend them with Cardenio; and that, as soon as he knew it, choosing those three gentlemen for his companions, he went to the place where she was, but did not speak to her, fearing, if she knew he was there, the monastery would be better guarded; and so waiting for a day, when the porter's lodge was open, he left two to secure the door, and he with the other entered into the convent in search of Lucinda, whom they found in the cloisters talking to a nun; and snatching her away, without giving her time for anything, they came with her to a place where they accommodated themselves with whatever was needful for the carrying her off; all which they could very safely do, the monastery being in the fields, a good way out of the town. He said, that, when Lucinda saw herself in his power, she swooned away, and that when she came to herself, she did nothing but weep, and sigh, without speaking one word: and that in this manner, accompanied with silence and tears, they arrived at that inn, which to him was arriving at heaven, where all earthly misfortunes have an end.


CHAPTER 37
Wherein is continued the history of the famous Infanta Micomicona, with other pleasant adventures.

SANCHO heard all this with no small grief of mind, seeing that the hope of his preferment was disappearing and vanishing into smoke; and that the fair princess Micomicona was turned into Dorothea, and the giant into Don Fernando, while his master lay in a sound sleep without troubling his head about what passed. Dorothea could not be sure whether the happiness she enjoyed was not a dream. Cardenio was in the same doubt; and Lucinda knew not what to think. Don Fernando gave thanks to heaven for the blessing bestowed on him, in bringing him out of that perplexed labyrinth, in which he was upon the brink of losing his honour and his soul. In short, all that were in the inn were pleased at the happy conclusion of such intricate and hopeless affairs. The priest, like a man of sense, placed everything in its true light, and congratulated every one upon their share of the good that had befallen them. But she who rejoiced most, and was most delighted, was the hostess, Cardenio and the

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