Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

the same means I had been ransomed myself, depositing the whole money with the merchant, that he might safely and securely pass his word for us; to whom nevertheless we did not discover our management and secret, because of the danger it would have exposed us to.'


CHAPTER 41
Wherein the captive continues the story of his adventures.

'IN less than fifteen days our renegado had bought a very good bark, capable of holding above thirty persons, and to make sure work, and give the business a colour, he made a short voyage to a place called Sargel, thirty leagues from Algiers, towards Oran, to which there is a great trade for dried figs. Two or three times he made this trip, in company of the Tagarin aforesaid. The Moors of Aragon are called in Barbary Tagarins, and those of Granada Mudéjares; and in the kingdom of Fez the Mudéjares are called Elches, who are the people the king makes most use of in his wars.

'You must know, that each time he passed with his bark, he cast anchor in a little creek, not two bow-shots distant from the garden, where Zoraida expected us: and there the renegado designedly set himself, together with the Moors that rowed, either to perform the cela,* or to practise, by way of jest, what he intended to execute in earnest; and with this view he would go to Zoraida's garden, and beg some fruit which her father would give him, without knowing who he was. His design was, as he afterwards told me, to speak to Zoraida, and to tell her that he was the person, who, by my direction, was to carry her to Christendom, and that she might be easy and secure: but it was impossible for him to do it, the Moorish women never suffering themselves to be seen either by Moor or Turk, unless when commanded by their husbands or fathers. Christian slaves indeed are allowed to keep company and converse with them, with more freedom perhaps than is proper. But I should have been sorry if he had talked to her, because it might have frighted her to see that the business was entrusted with a renegado. But God, who ordered it otherwise, gave the renegado no opportunity of effecting his good design: who, finding how securely he went to and from Sargel, and

-362-

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