Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

'Sir, the day comes on apace, and it will not be advisable to let the sun overtake us in the street: it will be better to retire out of the city, and that your worship shelter yourself in some grove hereabouts, and I will return by daylight, and leave no nook or corner in all the town unsearched for this house, castle, or palace of my lady's; and I shall have ill luck if I do not find it: and as soon as I have found it, I will speak to her ladyship, and will tell her where, and how your worship is waiting for her orders and direction for you to see her without prejudice to her honour or reputation.'

'Sancho,' quoth Don Quixote, 'you have uttered a thousand sentences in the compass of a few words; the counsel you give I relish much, and accept of most heartily: come along, son, and let us seek where we can take covert: afterwards, as you say, you shall return to seek, see, and speak to my lady, from whose discretion and courtesy I expect more than miraculous favours.'

Sancho stood upon thorns till he got his master out of town, lest he should detect the lie of the answer he carried him to the Sierra Morena, pretending it came from Dulcinea: and therefore he made haste to be gone, which they did instantly: and about two miles from the place they found a grove or wood, in which Don Quixote took shelter, while Sancho returned back to the city to speak to Dulcinea; in which embassy there befell him things which require fresh attention and fresh credit.


CHAPTER 10 .
Wherein is related the cunning used by Sancho in enchanting the lady Dulcinea, with other events as ridiculous as true

THE author of this grand history, coming to relate what is contained in this chapter, says, he had a mind to have passed it over it silence, fearing not to be believed, because herein Don Quixote's madness exceeds all bounds, and rises to the utmost pitch, even two bowshots beyond the greatest extravagance: however, notwithstanding this fear and diffidence, he has set everything down in the manner it was transacted, without adding to, or diminishing a tittle from the truth of the story, and not regarding the objections that might be made against his veracity: and he had reason: for truth may be

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