Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

side with that on her face; but hairs of the length you mention are somewhat of the longest for moles.'

'Yet I can assure your worship,' answered Sancho, 'that there they were, and looked as if they had been born with her.'

'I believe it, friend,' replied Don Quixote; 'for nature has placed nothing about Dulcinea but what is finished and perfect; and therefore had she a hundred moles, like those you speak of, in her they would not be moles, but moons and resplendent stars. But, tell me, Sancho, that which to me appeared to be a pannel, and which you adjusted, was it a side-saddle, or a pillion?'

'It was a side-saddle,' answered Sancho, 'with a field covering, worth half a kingdom for the richness of it.'

'And why could not I see all this, Sancho?' quoth Don Quixote. 'Well, I say it again, and will repeat it a thousand times, that I am the most unfortunate of men.'

The sly rogue Sancho had much ado to forbear laughing, to hear the fooleries of his master, who was so delicately gulled. In fine, after many other discourses passed between them, they mounted their beasts again, and followed the road to Saragossa, which they intended to reach in time to be present at a solemn festival wont to be held every year in that noble city. But, before their arrival, there befell them things, which for their number, greatness, and novelty, deserve to be written, and read, as will be seen.


CHAPTER 11
Of the strange adventure which befell the valorous Don Quixote with the wain or cart of the Parliament of Death.

Don Quixote went on his way exceeding pensive, to think what a
base trick the enchanters had played him, in transforming his lady
Dulcinea into the homely figure of a country wench; nor could he
devise what course to take to restore her to her former state. And
these meditations so distracted him, that, without perceiving it, he
let drop the bridle on Rosinante's neck; who, finding the liberty that
was given him, at every step turned aside to take a mouthful of the
fresh grass, with which those fields abounded. Sancho brought him
back out of his maze, by saying to him:

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