Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

tures; for this country, I see, is like to afford us many and very extraordinary ones.'

Then he wheeled Rosinante about: Sancho took his Dapple: Death and all his flying squadron returned to their cart, and pursued their way. And this was the happy conclusion of the terrible adventure of Death's cart; thanks to the wholesome advice Sancho Panza gave his master, to whom the day following there fell out an adventure, no less surprising than the former, with an enamoured knight-errant.


CHAPTER 12 .
Of the strange adventure, which befell the valorous Don Quixote, with the brave Knight of the Looking-glasses

DON QUIXOTE and his squire passed the night ensuing the encounter with Death under some lofty and shady trees. Don Quixote, at Sancho's persuasion, refreshed himself with some of the provisions carried by Dapple; and, during supper, Sancho said to his master:

'Sir, what a fool should I have been, had I chosen, as a reward for my good news, the spoils of the first adventure your worship should achieve, before the three ass-colts? Verily, verily, a sparrow in the hand is better than a vulture upon the wing.'

'However, Sancho,' answered Don Quixote, 'had you suffered me to attack as I had a mind to do, your share of the booty would at least have been the emperor's crown of gold and Cupid's painted wings; for I would have plucked them off against the grain, and put them into your possession.'

'The crowns and sceptres of your theatrical emperors,' answered Sancho, 'never were of pure gold, but of tinsel, or copper.'

'It is true,' replied Don Quixote; 'nor would it be fit, that the decorations of a play should be real, but counterfeit, and mere show, as comedy itself is, which I would have you value and take into favour, and consequently the actors and authors; for they are all instruments of much benefit to the commonweal, setting at every step a looking-glass before our eyes, in which we see very lively representations of the actions of human life: and there are no

-537-

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