Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

Toboso's torn and dirty shoe is preferable to the ill-combed, though clean, locks of Casildea; and I promise to go and return from her presence to yours, and give you an exact and particular account of what you require of me.'

'You must likewise confess and believe,' added Don Quixote, 'that the knight you vanquished was not and could not be Don Quixote de la Mancha, but somebody else like him; as I do confess and believe, that you, though, in appearance, the bachelor Sampson Carrasco, are not he, but some other, whom my enemies have purposely transformed into his likeness, to restrain the impetuosity of my choler, and make me use with moderation the glory of my conquest.'

'I confess, judge of, and allow everything, as you believe, judge of, and allow,' answered the disjointed knight: 'Suffer me to rise, I beseech you, if the hurt of my fall will permit, which has left me sorely bruised.'

Don Quixote helped him to rise, as did his squire, Tom Cecial, from off whom Sancho could not remove his eyes, asking him things, the answers to which convinced him evidently of his being really that Tom Cecial he said he was. But he was so prepossessed by what his master had said of the enchanters having changed the Knight of the Looking-glasses into the bachelor Sampson Carrasco, that he could not give credit to what he saw with his eyes. In short, master and man remained under this mistake; and he of the Looking-glasses, with his squire, much out of humour, and in ill plight, parted from Don Quixote and Sancho, to look for some convenient place, where he might cere-cloth himself and splinter his ribs.* Don Quixote and Sancho continued their journey to Saragossa, where the history leaves them to give an account who the Knight of the Looking- glasses and his nosey squire were.


CHAPTER 15
Giving an account, who the Knight of the Looking-glasses and his squire were.

EXCEEDINGLY content, elated, and vainglorious was Don Quixote, at having gained the victory over so valiant a knight, as he imagined him of the Looking-glasses to be; from whose knightly word he

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