Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

'I accept of the offer as a great favour and kindness, Señor Don Diego,' answered Don Quixote: and spurring on a little more than they had hitherto done, it was about two in the afternoon when they arrived at the village, and the house of Don Diego, whom Don Quixote called The Knight of the Green Riding-coat.


CHAPTER 18
Of what befell Don Quixote in the castle or house of the Knight of the Green Riding-coat with other extravagant matters.

DON QUIXOTE found that Don Diego's house was spacious, after the country fashion, having the arms of the family carved in rough stone over the great gates; the buttery in the courtyard, the cellar under the porch, and several earthen wine jars placed round about it, which being of the ware of Toboso, renewed the memory of his enchanted and metamorphosed Dulcinea; and without considering what he said, or before whom, he sighed, and cried:

'"O sweet pledges, found now to my sorrow; sweet and joyous, when heaven would have it so!"* O ye Tobosan jars, that have brought back to my remembrance the sweet pledge of my greatest bitterness!'

This was overheard by the poetical scholar, Don Diego's son, who, with his mother, was come out to receive him; and both mother and son were in admiration at the strange figure of Don Quixote, who, alighting from Rosinante, very courteously desired leave to kiss the lady's hands; and Don Diego said:

'Receive, madam, with your accustomed civility, Señor Don Quixote de la Mancha here present, a knight-errant, and the most valiant, and most ingenious person in the world.'

The lady, whose name was Doña Christina, received him with tokens of much affection and civility, and Don Quixote returned them in discreet and courteous expressions. The same kind of compliments passed between him and the student, whom by his talk Don Quixote took for a witty and acute person.

Here the author* sets down all the particulars of Don Diego's house, describing all the furniture usually contained in the mansion of a gentleman that was both a farmer and rich. But the translator of

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