Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; E. C. Riley et al. | Go to book overview

Don Quixote clung about Sancho's neck, giving him a thousand kisses on the forehead and cheeks. The duke and duchess, and all the bystanders, gave signs of being mightily pleased, and the car began to move on; and, in passing by, the fair Dulcinea bowed her head to the duke and duchess, and made a low curtsy to Sancho. By this time the cheerful and joyous dawn came apace; the flowerets of the field expanded their fragrant bosoms, and erected their heads; and the liquid crystals of the brooks, murmuring through the white and grey pebbles, went to pay their tribute to the rivers that expected them. The earth rejoiced, the sky was clear, and the air serene; each singly, and all together, giving manifest tokens, that the day which trod upon Aurora's heels would be fair and clear. The duke and duchess, being satisfied with the sport, and having executed their design so ingeniously and happily, returned to their castle, with an intention of seconding their jest; since nothing real could have afforded them more pleasure.


CHAPTER 36 .
Wherein is related the strange and never-imagined adventure of the Afflicted Matron, alias the Countess of Trifaldi; with a letter written by Sancho Panza to his wife Teresa Panza

THE duke had a steward, of a very pleasant and facetious wit, who represented Merlin, and contrived the whole apparatus of the late adventure, composed the verses, and made a page act Dulcinea. And now, with the duke and duchess's leave, he prepared another scene, of the pleasantest and strangest contrivance imaginable.

The next day, the duchess asked Sancho, whether he had begun the task of the penance he was to do for the disenchanting of Dulcinea. He said, he had, and had given himself five lashes that night. The duchess desired to know with what he had given them. He answered, with the palm of his hand.

'That,' replied the duchess, 'is rather clapping than whipping; and I am of opinion, Señor Merlin will hardly be contented at so easy a rate. Honest Sancho must get a rod made of briers, or of whipcord, that the lashes may be felt; for letters written in blood stand good, and the liberty of so great a lady as Dulcinea is not to be purchased

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