Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

the contract, and took the lady's confession; she acknowledged the whole, and was ordered into the custody of an honest alguazil of the court.'

Here Sancho said:

'What! are there court-alguazils, poets, and roundelays in Candaya too? if so, I swear I think the world is the same everywhere: but, Madam Trifaldi, pray make haste; for it grows late, and I die to hear the end of this so very long story.'

'That I will,' answered the countess.


CHAPTER 39
Wherein Trifaldi continues her stupendous and memorable history.

AT every word Sancho spoke, the duchess was in as high delight as Don Quixote was at his wit's end; who commanding him to hold his peace, the Afflicted [One] went on, saying:

'In short, after many pros and cons, the infanta standing stiffly to her engagement, without varying or departing from her first declaration, the vicar pronounced sentence in favour of Don Clavijo, and gave her to him to wife: at which the queen, Doña Maguncia, mother to the Infanta Antonomasia, was so much disturbed, that we buried her in three days' time.'

'She died then, I suppose,' quoth Sancho.

'Most assuredly,' answered Trifaldin; 'for in Candaya, they do not bury the living, but the dead.'

'Master Squire,' replied Sancho, 'it has happened ere now, that a person in a swoon has been buried for dead; and, in my opinion, Queen Maguncia ought to have swooned away rather than have died; for, while there is life there is hope; and the infanta's transgression was not so great, that she should lay it so much to heart. Had the lady married one of her pages, or any other servant of the family, as many others have done, as I have been told, the mischief had been without remedy; but she having made choice of a cavalier, so much a gentleman, and of such parts as he is here painted to us, verily, verily, though perhaps it was foolish, it was not so very much so as some people think: for, according to the rules of my master, who is here present, and will not let me lie, as bishops are made out of learned

-718-

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