Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

'Enough, Mistress Rodriguez,' quoth Don Quixote; 'and, Madam Trifaldi and company, I trust in God, that He will look upon your distresses with an eye of goodness; and as for Sancho, he shall do what I command him. I wish Clavileño were once come, and that Malambruno and I were at it; for I am confident, no razor would more easily shave your ladyships beards, than my sword shall shave off Malambruno's head from his shoulders: for though God permits the wicked to prosper, it is but for a time.'

'Ah!' quoth the Afflicted [One] at this juncture, 'valorous knight, may all the stars of the celestial regions behold your worship with eyes of benignity, and infuse into your heart all prosperity and courage, to be the shield and refuge of our reviled and dejected order, abominated by apothecaries, murmured at by squires, and scoffed at by pages. Ill betide the wretch, who, in the flower of her age, does rather profess herself a nun, than a duenna. Unfortunate we the duennas! though we descended in a direct male line from Hector of Troy, our mistresses will never forbear "thouing" us, were they to be made queens for it. O giant Malambruno, who, though thou art an enchanter, are very punctual in thy promises, send us now the incomparable Clavileño, that our misfortune may have an end; for, if the heats come on, and these beards of ours continue, woe be to us.'

The Trifaldi uttered this with so deep a concern, that she drew tears from the eyes of all the bystanders, and even made Sancho's overflow; and he purposed in his heart to accompany his master to the farthest part of the world, if on that depended the clearing of those venerable faces of their wool.


CHAPTER 41
Of the arrival of Clavileño, with the conclusion of this prolix adventure.

IN the meanwhile night came on, and with it the point of time prefixed for the arrival of the famous horse Clavileño: whose stay perplexed Don Quixote very much, thinking that, since Malambruno delayed sending him, either he was not the knight for whom this adventure was reserved, or Malambruno durst not encounter him in single combat. But, behold, on a sudden, four savages enter the garden, all clad in green ivy, and bearing on their shoulders a

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