Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; E. C. Riley et al. | Go to book overview

and spent, and confess I have not strength enough to take it from her.'

And so he left her. Then said the governor to the woman:

'Give me that purse, virtuous virago.'

She presently delivered it, and the governor returned it to the man, and said to the forceful, but not forced damsel:

'Sister of mine, had you shown the same, or but half as much courage and resolution in defending you chastity, as you have done in defending your purse, the strength of Hercules could not have forced you. Begone, in God's name, and in an ill hour, and be not found in all this island, nor in six leagues round about it, upon pain of two hundred stripes: begone instantly, I say, thou prating, shameless, cheating hussy!'

The woman was confounded, and went away, hanging down her head, and discontented; and the governor said to the man:

'Honest man, go home, in the name of God, with your money, and from henceforward, unless you have a mind to lose it, take care not to yoke with anybody.'

The countryman gave him thanks after the clownishest manner he could, and went his way;* and the bystanders were in fresh admiration at the decisions and sentences of their new governor. All which, being noted down by his historiographer, was immediately transmitted to the duke, who waited for it with a longing impatience. And here let us leave honest Sancho; for his master, greatly disturbed* at Altisidora's music, calls in haste for us.


CHAPTER 46
Of the dreadful bellringing and cattish consternation Don Quixote was put into in the progress of the enamoured Altisidora's amour.

WE left the great Don Quixote wrapped up in the reflections occasioned by the music of the enamoured damsel Altisidora. He carried them with him to bed; and, as if they had been fleas, they would not suffer him to sleep, or take the least rest. To these was added the disaster of the stocking. But as time is swift, and no bar can stop him, he came riding upon the hours, and that of the morning posted on apace. Which Don Quixote perceiving, he forsook his downy pillow,

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