Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

all, the tale had been told, and all these weepings and wailings, and takings-on at this rate, might have been spared.'

'That is true,' answered the damsel; 'but the confusion I was in was so great, that it did not suffer me to demean myself as I ought.'

'There is no harm,' answered Sancho: 'we will see you safe to your father's; perhaps he has not missed you; and hence-forward be not so childish, nor so eager to see the world; for, The maid that is modest, and a broken leg, should stay at home; and, The woman and the hen are lost by gadding abroad; and, She who desires to see, desires no less to be seen. I say no more.'

The youth thanked the governor for the favour he intended them, in seeing them safe home, and so they bent their course that way; for the house was not far off. When they were arrived, the brother threw up a little stone to a grated window, and that instant, a servant-maid, who waited for them, came down, and opened the door, and they went in, leaving every one in admiration at their genteelness and beauty, as well as at their desire of seeing the world by night, and without stirring out of the town: but they imputed all to their tender years.

The sewer's heart was pierced through and through, and he proposed within himself to demand her, the next day, of her father in marriage, taking it for granted he would not refuse him, as being a servant of the duke's. Sancho too had some thoughts of matching the young man with his daughter Sanchica, and determined to bring it about the first opportunity, fancying to himself, that no match would be refused the governor's daughter.

Thus ended that night's round, and, two days after, the government too, which put an end to all his designs and expectations, as shall hereafter be shown.


CHAPTER 50 .
In which is declared who were the enchanters and executioners that whipped the duenna, and pinched and scratched Don Quixote; with the success of the page, who carried the letter to Teresa Panza, Sancho's wife

CID HAMET, the most punctual searcher after the very atoms of this true history, says, that when Doña Rodriguez went out of her

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