Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

And that same day Don Antonio purposed to carry him to see the galleys, which lay in the road; whereat Sancho rejoiced much, having never in his life seen any. Don Antonio gave notice to the commodore of the four galleys, that he would bring his guest, the renowned Don Quixote de la Mancha, that afternoon, to see them, of whom the commodore, and all the inhabitants of the city, had some knowledge; and what befell him there, shall be told in the following chapter.


CHAPTER 63
Of the unlucky accident which befell Sancho Panza, in visiting the galleys, and the strange adventure of the beautiful Morisco.

MANY were the reflections Don Quixote made upon the answer of the enchanted head, none of them hitting upon the trick of it, and all centring in the promise, which he looked upon as certain, of the disenchantment of Dulcinea. He rejoiced within himself, believing he should soon see the accomplishement of it; and Sancho, though he abhorred being a governor, as has been said, had still a desire to command again, and be obeyed: such is the misfortune power brings along with it, though but in jest.

In short, that evening, Don Antonio Moreno, and his two friends, with Don Quixote, and Sancho, went to the galleys. The commodore of the four galleys, who had notice of the coming of the two famous personages, Don Quixote and Sancho, no sooner perceived them approach the shore, but he ordered all the galleys to strike their awnings, and the waits to play: and immediately he sent out the pinnace, covered with rich carpets, and furnished with cushions of crimson velvet; and, just as Don Quixote set his foot into it, the captain-galley discharged her forecastle piece, and the other galleys did the like; and, at his mounting the ladder on the starboard-side, all the crew of slaves saluted him, as the custom is, when a person of rank comes on board, with three 'Hu, hu, hu's'. The general (for so we shall call him), who was a gentleman of quality of Valencia, gave Don Quixote his hand, and embraced him, saying:

'This day will I mark with a white stone, as one of the best I ever wish to see while I live, having seen Señor Don Quixote de la

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