Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 65
In which an account is given who the Knight of the White Moon was; with the liberty of Don Gregorio, and other accidents.

DON ANTONIO MORENO followed the Knight of the White Moon. A great number of boys also pursued and persecuted him, till they had lodged him in an inn within the city. Don Antonio went in after him, being desirous to know who he was. His squire came out to receive and unarm him. He shut himself up in a lower room, and with him Don Antonio, whose cake was dough, till he knew who he was. He of the White Moon perceiving that this gentleman would not leave him, said:

'I very well know, sir, the design of your coming, which is, to learn who I am; and, because there is no occasion for concealing it, while my servant is unarming me, I will inform you, without deviating a tittle from the truth. Know, sir, that I am called the bachelor Sampson Carrasco: I am of the same town with Don Quixote de la Mancha, whose madness and folly move all that know him to compassion. Of those who had most pity for him, was I, and, believing his recovery to depend upon his being quiet, and staying at home in his own house, I contrived how to make him continue there. And so, about three months ago, I sallied forth to the highway like a knighterrant, styling myself Knight of the Looking-glasses, designing to fight with him, and vanquish him, without doing him harm, the condition of our combat being, that the vanquished should remain at the discretion of the vanquisher: and what I, concluding him already vanquished, intended to enjoin him, was, that he should return to his village, and not stir out of it in a whole year; in which time he might be cured. But fortune ordained it otherwise; for he vanquished me, and tumbled me from my horse, and so my design did not take effect. He pursued his journey, and I returned home, vanquished, ashamed, and bruised with the fall, which was a very dangerous one.

'Nevertheless, I lost not the desire of finding him, and vanquishing him, as you have seen this day. And, as he is so exact and punctual in observing the laws of knight-errantry, he will doubtless keep that I have laid upon him, and will be as good as his word. This, sir, is the business; and I have nothing to add, but only to entreat you not to discover me, nor to let Don Quixote know who I am, that my good

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