Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

behind, that, like a concealed root, may hereafter spring up, and spread venomous fruit through Spain, already cleared, already freed from the fears our vast numbers kept the kingdom in. A most heroic resolution of the great Philip the Third, and unheard-of wisdom in committing this charge to the said Don Bernardino de Velasco!'

'However, when I am at court,' said Don Antonio, 'I will use all the diligence and means possible, and leave the success to heaven. Don Gregorio shall go with me, to comfort his parents under the affliction they must be in for his absence: Anna Felix shall stay at my house with my wife, or in a monastery; and I am sure the viceroy will be glad, that honest Ricote remain in his house, till he sees the success of my negotiation.' The viceroy consented to all that was proposed.

But Don Gregorio, knowing what passed, expressed great unwillingness to leave Anna Felix: but, resolving to visit his parents, and to concert the means of returning for her, he came at length into the proposal. Anna Felix remained with Don Antonio's lady, and Ricote in the viceroy's house.

The day of Don Antonio's departure came, and that of Don Quixote's and Sancho's two days after, his fall not permitting him to travel sooner. At Don Gregorio's parting from Anna Felix, all was tears, sighs, swoonings, and sobbings. Ricote offered Don Gregorio a thousand crowns, if he desired them; but he would accept only of five, that Don Antonio lent him, to be repaid when they met at court. With this they both departed; and Don Quixote and Sancho afterwards, as has been said; Don Quixote, unarmed, and in a travelling dress, and Sancho on foot, because Dapple was loaded with the armour.


CHAPTER 66
Treating of matters, which he, who reads, will see; and he, who hears them read, will hear.

AT going out of Barcelona, Don Quixote turned about to see the spot where he was overthrown, and said:

'Here stood Troy; here my misfortunes, not my cowardice, despoiled me of my acquired glory: here I experienced the fickleness

-898-

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