Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; E. C. Riley et al. | Go to book overview

cheese; and taking out a little loaf, he and Sancho sat down upon the green grass, and, in peace and good fellowship, quickly dispatched, and got to the bottom of the provisions in the wallet, with so good an appetite, that they licked the very packet of letters, because it smelt of cheese. Said Tosilos to Sancho:

'Doubtless, friend Sancho, this master of yours ought to be reckoned a madman.'

'Why ought?' replied Sancho; 'he owes nothing to anybody; for he pays for everything, especially where madness is current. I see it full well, and full well I tell him of it: but what boots it, especially now that there is an end of him; for he is vanquished by the Knight of the White Moon.'

Tosilos desired him to tell him what had befallen him: but Sancho said, it was unmannerly to let his master wait for him, and that some other time, if they met, he should have leisure to do it. And rising up, after he had shaken his loose upper coat, and the crumbs from his beard, he drove Dapple before him, and, bidding Tosilos adieu, he left him, and overtook his master, who was staying for him under the shade of a tree.


CHAPTER 67
Of the resolution Don Quixote took to turn shepherd, and lead a rural life, till the year of his promise should be expired; with other accidents truly pleasant and good.

IF various cogitations perplexed Don Quixote before his defeat, many more tormented him after his overthrow. He stayed, as has been said, under the shade of a tree, where reflections, like flies about honey, assaulted and stung him; some dwelling upon the disenchantment of Dulcinea, and others upon the life he was to lead in his forced retirement. Sancho came up, and commended to him the generosity of the lackey Tosilos.

'Is it possible, Sancho,' said Don Quixote, 'that you persist in thinking that he is a real lackey? You seem to have quite forgot that you saw Dulcinea converted and transformed into a country wench, and the Knight of the Looking-glasses into the bachelor Sampson Carrasco: all the work of enchanters, who persecute me. But tell me,

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