Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

receive Altisidora, and help her down from the tomb; who counter- feiting a person fainting, inclined her head to the duke and duchess, and to the kings, and looking askew at Don Quixote, said:

'God forgive you, unrelenting knight, through whose cruelty I have been in the other world, to my thinking, above a thousand years! and thee I thank, O most compassionate squire of all the globe contains, for the life I enjoy! From this day, friend Sancho, six of my smocks are at your service, to be made into so many shirts for your- self; and, if they are not all whole, at least they are all clean.'

Sancho, with his mitre in his hand, and his knee on the ground, kissed her hand. The duke ordered it to be taken from him, and his cap to be returned him, and his own garment instead of the flaming robe. Sancho begged the duke to let him keep the mitre and frock, having a mind to carry them to his own country, in token and memory of this unheard-of adventure. The duchess replied, he should have them, for he knew how much she was his friend. Then the duke ordered the court to be cleared, and everybody to retire to their own apartment, and that Don Quixote and Sancho should be conducted to their old lodgings.


CHAPTER 70
Which follows the sixty-ninth, and treats of matters indispensably necessary to the perspicuity of this history.

SANCHO slept that night on a truckle-bed in the same chamber with Don Quixote, a thing he would have excused, if he could; for he well knew his master would disturb his sleep with questions and answers, and he was not much disposed to talk, the smart of his past sufferings being still present to him, and an obstruction to the free use of his tongue; and he would have liked better to have lain in a hovel alone, than in that rich apartment in company. His fear proved so well founded, and his suspicion so just, that, scarcely was his master got into bed, when he said:

'What think you, Sancho, of this night's adventure? Great and mighty is the force of rejected love, as your own eyes can testify, which saw Altisidora dead, by no other darts, no other sword, nor any other warlike instrument, nor by deadly poison, but merely by

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