Genoa & the Genoese, 958-1528

By Steven A. Epstein | Go to book overview

Epilogue

By way of concluding, I offer some personal views from a medieval perspective on the rest of Genoese history. It is neither practical nor useful to summarize more centuries in a few paragraphs, so instead I return to my original themes -- Islam, mercantile culture, labor and charity, and the city proper -- for some pointers on how to understand what has happened to Genoa since 15528.1

Gian Andrea Doria, the grandnephew of the great Andrea, poorly led the small Genoese contingent at the great sea battle with the Turks at Lepanto in 1571. Chios, lost to the Ottomans back in 1566, marked the end of Genoa's eastern sea empire, just as Lepanto was its last great naval battle. Yet Genoa remained active in the eastern trade, even as the rise of Tuscan Livorno in the seventeenth century created a new rival and neighbor. In 1669 Genoa declared itself a free port and helped to preserve its trade for a while, though in the end France came to dominate European relations with the Ottomans. But as Muslim power and wealth in the Mediterranean declined, so did Genoa's role as a key link between east and west. A Spanish Muslim writing in the twelfth century told a legend that the Genoese were themselves descendants of apostate Arabs who

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Genoa & the Genoese, 958-1528
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Figures & Maps xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Genoa & the Genoese, 958-1528 1
  • 1 - From Practically Nothing to Something, 958-1154 9
  • 2 - The Takeoff, 1154-1204 54
  • 3 - Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, 1204-1257 96
  • 4 - Captains of the People, 1257-1311 140
  • 5 - Long Live the People, the Merchants, & the Doge, 1311-1370 188
  • 6 - Liberty and Humanism: Slavery and the Bank, 1370-1435 228
  • 7 - To Throw Away a Thousand Worlds, 1436-1528 271
  • Epilogue 319
  • Appendix - Genoese Revolts and Changes in Government, 1257-1528 325
  • Notes 329
  • Bibliography 369
  • Index 383
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