Editor's Note

This is not a book about President Roosevelt. It is an effort to communicate, through the words of many writers, something of the ideas, the problems, and the actions of men and women in Franklin Roosevelt's America between 1932 and 1945. The degree to which that age, or any age, expresses itself in its literature must remain ultimately unknown and unknowable. The editor who wrenches out of context those writings and portions of writings that seem to him capable of evoking significant moments or experiences is both privileged and handicapped by the unearned gift of historical hindsight. He can decide -- although not without trepidations -- that a given short story or poem captures the flavor of a moment in time. He is aware of the irony with which time can invest the most casual sketch or can nullify the most portentous prophecy or analysis. But, in his eagerness to find epitomes, he may give undeserved importance to an apparently symbolic work that actually sprang from purely local and personal motives; thus, Mr. James Thurber has been so kind as to explain that one of his admirable stories "was by no means the result of the period in America in any economic or political sense, but was written simply because a certain young woman had been for several months driving me nuts."

The editor may also become aware (as this one has) that some notable literary figures are missing from his compilation. But the purpose of this book has not been to excerpt the finest literary works published while Mr. Roosevelt was president, but rather to assemble a coherent and connected group of materials for a social history of the age. The work of Thomas Wolfe, for example, cannot be ignored by any literary historian of the Thirties; but it has little to contribute to such a book as this, partly because Wolfe's concerns were so predominantly personal, and also because his work must be read extensively to produce its characteristic effect.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Roosevelt Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 626

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.