The Magic Island

By B. Seabrook; Alexander King | Go to book overview

Chapter II
A NYMPH IN BRONZE

LEONCE BORNO, Haitian consul-general in New York, had written concerning us to his kinsman, Georges Baussan, Haiti's leading architect, who had designed the new national palace.

One morning soon after we were installed in the Hotel Montagne, a barefooted black wench tapped at our door and presented Monsieur Baussan's card on a silver tray. I mention the tray because this same wench had deemed her own dark and not too clean paw adequate for the cards of previous white callers. These amusing little variations do not occur by accident in Haiti. They frequently fill Americans with impotent or explosive rage. Pretense that the servants are dumb affords a fictitious safety-valve.

I found Monsieur Baussan on the terrace, tropically attired in white linen, tentatively twirling his watch-chain, standing at a distance and with his back turned to some elderly American women who were rocking and buzz-buzzing.

Haitians were no longer "encouraged" to stop at the Hotel Montagne, but the big terrace-veranda was neutral ground.

Monsieur Baussan was a griffe, that is to say brownskinned, midway between black and mulatto; he was past middle age, a large man, heavy, handsome, with fine mustaches, kinky hair; in his intelligent face there was an expression of veiled sadness, which, combined with his bulk and the slight yellow tinge in the whites of his eyeballs, made me think of a fine Saint Bernard dog.

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Magic Island
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.