ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

PORTIONS of this book have previously been published in Accent, Chimera, The Kenyon Review, The Sewanee Review, and View. And I wish to acknowledge here my indebtedness to the editors of these magazines.

I also wish to state my indebtedness to various publishers, editors, and authors for permission to quote certain copyrighted material; thus:

To International Publishers, for permission to quote from V. I. Lenin What Is To Be Done?

To The Macmillan Company, for permission to quote from Marianne Moore's Selected Poems and What Are Years? -- and from Herbert Read Poetry and Anarchism.

To the University of Chicago Press, for permission to quote from George Herbert Mead's The Philosophy of the Act and Otto Neurath Foundations of the Social Sciences.

To Little, Brown and Company, for permission to quote from Ralph Barton Perry's The Thought and Character of William James.

To the University of California Press, for permission to quote from Josephine Miles Pathetic Fallacy in the Nineteenth Century.

To Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc., for permission to quote from I. A. Richards ' Principles of Literary Criticism and Matthew Josephson JeanJacques Rousseau.

To Peter Smith, Publisher, for permission to quote from Baldwin's Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology.

To the Houghton Mifflin Company, for permission to quote from The Education of Henry Adams, by Henry Adams.

To Random House, Inc., for permission to quote from Eugene O'Neill Mourning Becomes Electra.

To Mr. Yvor Winters, for permission to quote from his Primitivism and Decadence, published by Arrow Editions.

To Mr. Allen Tate, for permission to quote from his Reason in Madness, published by G. P. Putnam's Sons.

To Mr. Edgar Johnson, for permission to quote from his One Mighty Torrent: The Drama of Biography, published by Stackpole Sons.

To The New Republic, for permission to quote from Stark Young review of Clifford Odets' Night Music.

To Partisan Review, for permission to quote from the essay by John Dewey that appeared in the "Failure of Nerve" controversy.

To Science & Society, for permission to quote from an article by Lewis S.Feuer

-vii-

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A Grammar of Motives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction: the Five Key Terms of Dramatism xv
  • Part One - Ways of Placement 1
  • I - Container and Thing Contained 3
  • II - Antinomies of Definition 21
  • III - Scope and Reduction 59
  • Part Two - The Philosophic Schools 125
  • I Scene 127
  • II - Agent in General 171
  • III - Act 227
  • IV - Agency and Purpose 275
  • Part Three - On Dialectic 321
  • I - He Dialectic of Constitutions 323
  • II - Dialectic in General 402
  • Appendix 445
  • Index 519
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