Exchanging Voices: A Collaborative Approach to Family Therapy

By Lynn Hoffman | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Gianfranco Cecchin

H aving followed the evolution of family therapy in the last twenty years, it is a moving experience for me to read Lynn Hoffman's account of her struggles, periods of confusion, and the intellectual challenges that have characterized this period of time. Lynn has been an extremely sensitive witness to the evolution of family therapy: aware of the limits of every discovery and of every truth most of us thought to be reliable enough to be enjoyed for a while. Lynn would be the first to feel uncomfortable with an idea and try to move on to a new perspective.

She appears like one who, faced and fascinated by her own or someone else's therapeutic ideology or practice, would spend enough time studying it completely enough to describe it with the appropriate words, and then move on to make an epistemological shift.

I think Lynn experienced and worked through all the significant periods of family therapy, from interventive and strategic to the present so-called postmodern orientation. All these moments are described in some of her books. One of these periods was her interest in the so-called Milan group, of which I was a member. Her visits

-ix-

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Exchanging Voices: A Collaborative Approach to Family Therapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Other Titles in the Systemic Thinking and Practice Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editors' Foreword vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - The Case Against Power and Control 5
  • Chapter Two - Joining Theory to Practice 57
  • Chapter Three - The Shift to Postmodernism 81
  • Chapter Four - Definitions for Simple Folk 103
  • Chapter Five - A Reflexive Stance 111
  • Chapter Six - Kitchen Talk 135
  • Chapter Seven - Trying to Write a Postmodern Text 163
  • Conclusion 203
  • Postscript 206
  • References 211
  • Index 220
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