Emerson at Home and Abroad

By Moncure Daniel Conway | Go to book overview

XVIII. THE SHOT HEARD ROUND THE WORLD.

IN the year 1836, the year of "Nature," Concord monument was completed, and Emerson's hymn sung, beginning --

"By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April's breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood,
And fired the shot heard round the world.

Two years later, from where that shot announced the of a nation, came a farmer to announce the birth s religion. On July 15, 1838, Emerson delivered before the senior class in Divinity College, Harvard University, that address which stands in the moral history of America where the Declaration of Independence stands in its political history. The Phi Beta Kappa oration of the previous year had excited discussions, questionings, enthusiasm; and the assembly which gathered to hear the new prophet's word on religion was not only large, but included the representative scholars and teachers of the country.

Never to be forgotten was the fatal melody that startled the air when that appeal to the young ministers was made. Its opening was as the outburst of

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Emerson at Home and Abroad
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • A Vigil. 1
  • I. Mayflowerings. 19
  • Ii. Forerunners. 28
  • Iii Three Fates. 41
  • Iv. a Boston Boy. 47
  • V. Student and Teacher. 51
  • Vi. Approbation. 58
  • Vii. Disapprobation. 67
  • Viii. a Sea-Change. 74
  • Ix. a Legend of Good Women. 81
  • X. the Wail of the Century. 90
  • Xi. Culture. 96
  • Xii. Eagle and Dove. 127
  • Xiii. Daily Bread. 132
  • Xiv. the Home. 139
  • Xv. Nature. 146
  • Xvi. Evolution. 154
  • Xvii. Sursum Corda. 162
  • Xviii. the Shot Heard Round the World. 167
  • Xix. Sangreal. 173
  • Xx. Building Tabernacles. 184
  • Xxi. a Six Years' Day-Dream. 194
  • Xxii. Lessons for the Day. 209
  • Xxiii. Concordia. 229
  • Xxiv. Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne. 256
  • Xxv. Thoreau. 279
  • Xxvi. "The Coming Man." 290
  • Xxvii. the Python. 299
  • Xviii. Emerson in England. 316
  • Xxix. the Diadem of Days. 347
  • Xxx. Lethe. 378
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