Pittsburgh: The Story of a City

By Leland D. Baldwin | Go to book overview

I Virginia Takes a Hand in the West

HAD an observer been able to station himself with a spyglass on the hill now known as Mount Washington on a bleak day in late November, 1753, he would have been rewarded by a panoramic view of the region about the Forks of the Ohio that was soon to engross the attention of the world. The glory of autumn has passed and the leaves hang lifelessly upon the branches or carpet the ground beneath. Save for the very shores of the rivers and for the little fields of the Indians and traders, trees are everywhere, spreading over the plains and the hilltops and clinging to the sides of the steepest hills.

At the bottom of a sheer drop of three hundred feet, and so close underneath that one could throw a stone into its depths, rushes the yellow Monongahela in flood. Flowing in from the northeast to meet it comes the Allegheny, ordinarily clear and pure, but now scarcely to be distinguished in color from its sister stream. The waters, united into the Ohio, flow northwest between two lines of forest-clad hills--the hills on the southwest side rising abruptly from the river, those on the other sloping more gradually away from the edge of the water. In the distance a low island cleaves the current and just beyond a bold rock, around which rises the smoke from the cabins of

-13-

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Pittsburgh: The Story of a City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Foreword ix
  • Contents xi
  • Maps xiii
  • Prologue- Lewis Evans, His Map 1
  • I- Virginia Takes a Hand in the West 13
  • II- How Are the Mighty Fallen! 27
  • III- Robbers'' Roost 38
  • IV- The Head of Iron 48
  • V- Britannia Rules the Ohio 55
  • VI- Pioneer Village in War and Peace 66
  • VII- "Intestin Broyls" 76
  • VIII- Revolt in the West 85
  • IX- Between Revolts 103
  • X- Tom the Tinker Comes to Town 117
  • XI- The Gateway to the West 129
  • XII- Genesis of an Industrial Empire 145
  • XIII- Life under the Poplars 154
  • XIV- Clapboard Democracy 172
  • XV- From Turnpike to Railroad 184
  • XVI- Civic Pittsburgh, 1810-1860 201
  • XVII- "The Birmingham of America" 218
  • XVIII- The Emergence of a Metropolis 231
  • XIX- Moral and Cultural Advancement 248
  • XX- High and Low Life 268
  • XXI- National Politics on a Local Scale 285
  • XXII- Prelude to Strife 300
  • XXIII- The Sinews of War 311
  • XXIV- The Forge of America 326
  • XXV- Two Generations of Progress 341
  • Epilogue- Trends of the Times 358
  • Errata 369
  • Errata 381
  • Maps 383
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