Pittsburgh: The Story of a City

By Leland D. Baldwin | Go to book overview

VI Pioneer Village in War and Peace

THE storm that Pontiac and his conspirators had been conjuring up in the Northwest during the winter burst in May, 1763, and of the frontier posts only Detroit, Niagara, Pitt, Ligonier, and Bedford held out. There had been a number of murders of whites by Indians in the vicinity of Fort Pitt during May, and Ecuyer had done everything he could to put the fort into a state of defense, not a very easy matter, because of the damage caused by the late flood. Ecuyer, however, filled the gap in the ramparts with a palisade strengthened by a fraise with the sharpened stakes pointing outward, and erected firing parapets. The townsmen, less than a hundred in number, were at first organized into two companies of militia under William Trent but soon afterward were distributed among the regular troops. The first warning Pittsburgh had that an attack in force was imminent came on May 27 when a certain Turtle's Heart, after trading with a group of friends at the provincial store, sought out Alexander McKee, Croghan's deputy in the management of Indian affairs, and besought him to leave at once for the East. On the twenty-ninth word came that William Clapham and most of his family and servants had been killed on the Youghiogheny near the site of West Newton.

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Pittsburgh: The Story of a City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Foreword ix
  • Contents xi
  • Maps xiii
  • Prologue- Lewis Evans, His Map 1
  • I- Virginia Takes a Hand in the West 13
  • II- How Are the Mighty Fallen! 27
  • III- Robbers'' Roost 38
  • IV- The Head of Iron 48
  • V- Britannia Rules the Ohio 55
  • VI- Pioneer Village in War and Peace 66
  • VII- "Intestin Broyls" 76
  • VIII- Revolt in the West 85
  • IX- Between Revolts 103
  • X- Tom the Tinker Comes to Town 117
  • XI- The Gateway to the West 129
  • XII- Genesis of an Industrial Empire 145
  • XIII- Life under the Poplars 154
  • XIV- Clapboard Democracy 172
  • XV- From Turnpike to Railroad 184
  • XVI- Civic Pittsburgh, 1810-1860 201
  • XVII- "The Birmingham of America" 218
  • XVIII- The Emergence of a Metropolis 231
  • XIX- Moral and Cultural Advancement 248
  • XX- High and Low Life 268
  • XXI- National Politics on a Local Scale 285
  • XXII- Prelude to Strife 300
  • XXIII- The Sinews of War 311
  • XXIV- The Forge of America 326
  • XXV- Two Generations of Progress 341
  • Epilogue- Trends of the Times 358
  • Errata 369
  • Errata 381
  • Maps 383
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