Ixil Country: A Plural Society in Highland Guatemala

By Benjamin N. Colby; Pierre L. Van Den Berghe | Go to book overview

den Berghe briefly visited Chiapas and returned to Nebaj, where he remained until the end of August. At the same time, Fernando Cruz, a Guatemalan anthropology student, spent several weeks in the field gathering data on the Ixil cofradias. Van den Berghe worked mostly among ladinos, using the standard techniques of participant and nonparticipant observation; extended and repeated interviews, mostly unstructured, with a score of key informants; and analysis of the rather scanty municipal and parochial records. Field notes were written every evening from sketchy notations taken during the day. In addition, a 64-item questionnaire was distributed to a selected sample of forty literate ladinos. (For a description of sample characteristics see n. 4, chap. 3.) With both ladinos and Indians, van den Berghe used Spanish as the medium of communication. Except for a short trip to Chiapas, a two-day visit to the plantation of San Francisco, a day's visit to Chajul, another day in Cotzal, and a few days in Guatemala City, the entire period was spent in Nebaj. As field headquarters, we rented a large house owned by a local upper-class ladino and located on the central plaza of Nebaj.

In January, 1967, Colby returned to the field with his wife and children and gathered information mostly from Ixil informants, using both Spanish and Ixil questions and conversing in Spanish or with Spanish-Ixil interpreters. During the time thus far covered in field work, Colby has been mostly in Nebaj, though numerous trips lasting from one day to a week have been made to Chajul and Cotzal. Colby also made various trips on foot to outlying villages and hamlets such as Juil, Kamb'alam, and Pesla. In addition to attending religious ceremonies and rites and observing other Ixil activities, Colby made motionpicture records. In Guatemala City, where Lore Colby was based because of the children's school requirements, life histories, myths, folktales, discussions, and explanatory

-xii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ixil Country: A Plural Society in Highland Guatemala
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.