Appendix A: Four Futurist Manifestoes
1. INITIAL MANIFESTO OF FUTURISM ( February 20, 1909)
2. FUTURIST PAINTING: TECHNICAL MANIFESTO ( April 11 1910)
3. THE EXHIBITORS TO THE PUBLIC ( February 5, 1912)
4. TECHNICAL MANIFESTO OF FUTURIST SCULPTURE ( April 11, 1912)
NOTE: The first three manifestoes are here given in the translation published in the catalogue of the exhibition held at the Sackville Gallery, London, in March 1912. These three statements appeared regularly in the exhibition catalogues, and were translated into French and German as well as English. The manifesto on Futurist sculpture was translated recently by Richard Chase.
INITIAL MANIFESTO OF FUTURISM
( February 20, 1909)
1. We shall sing the love of danger, the habit of energy and boldness.
2. The essential elements of our poetry shall be courage, daring and rebellion.
3. Literature has hitherto glorified thoughtful immobility, ecstasy and sleep; we shall extol aggressive movement, feverish insomnia, the double quick step, the somersault, the box on the ear, the fisticuff.
4. We declare that the world's splendour has been enriched by a new beauty; the beauty of speed. A racing motor-car, its frame adorned with great pipes, like snakes with explosive breath . . . a roaring motor-car, which looks as though running on shrapnel, is more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace.
5. We shall sing of the man at the steering wheel, whose ideal stem transfixes the Earth, rushing over the circuit of her orbit.
6. The poet must give himself with frenzy, with splendour and with lavishness, in order to increase the enthusiastic fervour of the primordial elements.
7. There is no more beauty except in strife. No masterpiece without aggressiveness. Poetry must be a violent onslaught upon the unknown forces, to command them to bow before man.
8. We stand upon the extreme promontory of the centuries! . . . Why should we look behind us, when we have to break in the mysterious portals of the Impossible? Time and Space died yesterday. Already we live in the absolute, since we have already created speed, eternal and ever-present.
9. We wish to glorify War -- the only health giver of the world -- militarism, patriotism, the destructive arm of the Anarchist, the beautiful Ideas that kill, the contempt for woman.
10. We wish to destroy the museums, the libraries, to fight against moralism, feminism and all opportunistic and utilitarian meannesses.
11. We shall sing of the great crowds in the excitement of labour, pleasure and rebellion; of the multi-coloured and polyphonic surf of revolutions in modern capital cities; of the nocturnal vibration of arsenals and workshops beneath their violent electric moons; of the greedy stations swallowing smoking snakes; of factories suspended from the clouds by their strings of smoke; of bridges leaping like gymnasts over the diabolical cutlery of sunbathed rivers; of adventurous liners scenting the horizon; of broad-chested locomotives prancing on the rails, like huge steel horses bridled with long tubes; and of the gliding flight of aeroplanes, the sound of whose screw is like the flapping of flags and the applause of an enthusiastic crowd.

It is in Italy that we launch this manifesto of violence, destructive and incendiary, by which we this day found Futurism, because we would deliver Italy from its canker of professors, archaeologists, cicerones and antiquaries.

Italy has been too long the great market of the secondhand dealers. We would free her from the numberless museums which cover her with as many cemeteries.

Museums, cemeteries! . . . Truly identical with their sinister jostling of bodies that know one another not. Public dormitories where one sleeps for ever side by side with detested or unknown beings. Mutual ferocity of painters and sculptors slaying one another with blows of lines and colour in a single museum.

Let one pay a visit there each year as one visits one's dead once a year . . . That we can allow! . . . Deposit flowers even once a year at the feet of the Gioconda, if you will! . . . But to walk daily in the museums with our sorrows, our fragile courage and our anxiety, that is inadmissible! . . . Would you, then, poison yourselves? Do you want to decay?

____________________
First published in Le Figaro, Paris.

-124-

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Futurism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Lenders to the Exhibition 6
  • Foreword 7
  • The Futurist Goal 9
  • The Futurist Achievement 17
  • Notes to the Text 119
  • Chronology 121
  • Appendix A - Four Futurist Manifestoes 124
  • Appendix B - Boccioni Letters to Vico Baer 133
  • Selected 'Bibliography of Futurism: 1905-1961 135
  • Biographies and Catalogue of the Exhibition 141
  • Index 149
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