Selected 'Bibliography of Futurism: 1905-1961

On this occasion it is possible to compile a limited bibliography which offers adequate guidance to the general public and to scholars. In 1958 Drudi Gambillo and Fiori (bibl. 75) published an exhaustive record on Futurism, including comprehensive reprints of manifestoes and similar documents. The following year, Falqui (bibl. 78) issued a work of equal stature covering not only the Futurist literature but art and music as well. Other sources of information -- reported by Italians -- are noted below: an unpublished typescript prepared by Scheiwiller (bibl. 40), Apollonio's continuing inventory in La Biennale (bibl. 49), Necchi and Giani in Carrieri's history (bibl. 42), and Aeschlimann's review of. 1940-1952 editions (bibl. 53). Finally one can note the happy circumstance of an evaluated version of the fifty-seven page bibliography from the Archivi del Futurismo compressed into five pages for the Rome catalogue of 1959 (bibl. 79), and a cursory review of international commentary in La Biennale di Venezia (bibl. 76).

Where other references are lacking, certain surveys are still useful, such as the dictionaries of artists by Thieme and Becker and its modern complement by Vollmer (bibl. 56). Since the documentation in Skira's international enterprise, the History of Modern Painting, is largely the work of Hans Bolliger (bibl. 43), it constitutes a link between typical German studies, Degenhart (bibl. 68) and Haftmann (bibl. 62), and the Amour de l'Art anthology with "notices" by Germain Bazin (bibl. 33). Lately, Cahiers d'Art printed selected references in its Italian number (bibl. 45). American guides, to name but two, should include Clough's useful doctoral dissertation (bibl. 36) and the catalogue issued by The Museum of Modern Art for its show Twentieth-Century Italian Art (bibl. 41). Fortunately, English references continue to accumulate (bibl. 64), and translations have been noted on every occasion (bibl. 3, 9, 19, 36, 44; also 64, 67, 82, etc.).

In deference to Dr. Taylor's opinion that most comments on futurism in recent publications . . . are of doubtful value" owing to "mis-information and a strongly French prejudice," this chronological listing of over ioo citations incorporates a few of his suggestions from the Italian literature and a selective inventory of titles already proved useful in the Library -- presumably known and accessible to the public and student, here and elsewhere in the United States. For the convenience of the scholarly researcher, who will encounter frequent references to comparatively rare items in the major bibliographies, it can be mentioned that the Library can provide microfilm or photostat copies from the following: Lacerba, Montjoie!, Les Soirées de Paris, the early issues of Der Sturm, and, of course, representative Futurist manifestoes.

After the opening of the exhibition, lecturers may anticipate that lantern slides will be provided by the authorized agencies of the Museum: for black and white, Taurgo, and for color, Sandak.

BERNARD KARPEL Librarian of the Museum


GENERAL REFERENCES (bydate)

1 POESIA. Edited by Filippo Tommaso Marinetti. Milan, 1905- 1909. A literary journal of wide cultural interest, which published avant-garde poetry, and acted as pioneer publisher for early Futurism, including the manifestoes (bibl. 4) and an anthology (bibl. 7).

2 LA VOCE. Edited by Giuseppe Prezzolini. Florence, 1908 1916. Also edited for a short period by Giovanni Papini. Soffici associated as major art critic. For important articles, e. g. Roberto Longhi: Pittori futuristi ( April 10, 1913) see notations in bibl. 76. "An important force in encouraging rebellion against tradition"( Taylor).

3 MARINFTTI, FILIPPO TOMMASO. Futurist manifesto (Feb. 20, 1909). Architectural Review Aug. 1959. A "foundation document of extreme polemical violence", originally published in Figaro ( Paris) and in range and variety of issue rivaling the Dada and Surrealist pronouncements. This is a complete English translation, accompanied by running commentary, by Reyner Banham. Also published here, p. 124-125.

4 MANIFESTI DEL MOVIMENTO FUTURISTA: A Collection of Futurist Documents. [ Milan, etc., Direzione del Movimento Futurista , 1909-192?]. The Museum of Modern Art Library has assembled this representative collection in original (or photostat) for studying -- in addition to content -- typographical factors of style, scale, and layout. For dates see Taylor chronology; for supplemental details see Drudi Gambillo's chronological bibliography. Owing to the ephemeral nature of these leaflets, to their publication by chief or lesser figures, to their issuance as individual, group or anonymous statements, and to variations in time and place, the term "Futurist manifesto" has a certain flexibility. These broadsides were issued initially by "Poesia," then by the "Movimento Futurista," and after Jan. 1913, by "Lacerba." Most were republished either by that magazine or other contemporaneous journals, and in collections, notably Marinetti

-135-

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Futurism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Lenders to the Exhibition 6
  • Foreword 7
  • The Futurist Goal 9
  • The Futurist Achievement 17
  • Notes to the Text 119
  • Chronology 121
  • Appendix A - Four Futurist Manifestoes 124
  • Appendix B - Boccioni Letters to Vico Baer 133
  • Selected 'Bibliography of Futurism: 1905-1961 135
  • Biographies and Catalogue of the Exhibition 141
  • Index 149
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