Maude Adams: An Intimate Portrait

By Phyllis Robbins | Go to book overview

Chapter Eleven

THE SUMMER of 1901, spent by Maude at the Augustinian Convent in Tours, had a far more lasting effect on her whole life than the temporary break she sought there from her grinding theatre work.

In 1915, which was to prove so sad a year for her, she came back east to New York in March after a hard season, with a couple of weeks to herself before re-opening. She was remembering the peace and kindly quiet in Tours when she asked Miss Boynton to find a "French convent for one." Miss Boynton also at one time had stayed at the Augustinian Convent and knew just what Maude wanted, but was in despair about finding anything like it in New York.

Meanwhile Maude, during a fitting at her costumer's, Julia Ward, said to her: "I'm so tired. Do you know of a convent where I could rest?" Miss Ward telephoned to the Cenacle of St. Regis that she and the Reverend John J. Burke, C.S.P., Editor of The Catholic World, would appreciate it if the convent could make arrangements to receive Miss Adams as a guest for two weeks, to begin with. This covered the requisite Cenacle introductions. Mother Majoux, Superior, agreed, but suggested a personal interview for the details.

Miss Boynton, knowing nothing of all this, began her search. She writes:

I called at several convents, at random, with no results. After a very self-sufficient personage informed me that no religious house would admit an actress, I called at St. Regis, 628 West 140th Street, and inquired if they would receive Maude as a guest. There were no difficulties. I but mentioned her name, and referred to

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Maude Adams: An Intimate Portrait
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 21
  • Chapter Three 40
  • Chapter Four 58
  • Chapter Five 75
  • Chapter Six 89
  • Chapter Seven 110
  • Chapter Eight 124
  • Chapter Nine 140
  • Chapter Ten 155
  • Chapter Eleven 165
  • Chapter Twelve 174
  • Chapter Thirteen 186
  • Chapter Fourteen 201
  • Chapter Fifteen 213
  • Chapter Sixteen 232
  • Chapter Seventeen 247
  • Chapter Eighteen 257
  • Chapter Nineteen 263
  • Chapter Twenty 284
  • Appendix 292
  • Index 299
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