"I am sure I beg your pardon," said Charles. "I appear always to be intruding."

By now Margaret wished she had never mentioned her trouble to her husband. Retreat was impossible. He was determined to push the matter to a satisfactory conclusion, and Helen faded as he talked. Her fair, flying hair and eager eyes counted for nothing, for she was ill, without rights, and any of her friends might hunt her. Sick at heart, Margaret joined in the chase. She wrote her sister a lying letter, at her husband's dictation; she said the furniture was all at Howards End, but could be seen on Monday next at 3 p.m., when a charwoman would be in attendance. It was a cold letter, and the more plausible for that. Helen would think she was offended. And on Monday next she and Henry were to lunch with Dolly, and then ambush themselves in the garden.

After they had gone, Mr. Wilcox said to his son: "I can't have this sort of behaviour, my boy. Margaret's too sweet-natured to mind, but I mind for her."

Charles made no answer.

"Is anything wrong with you, Charles, this afternoon?"

"No, Pater; but you may be taking on a bigger business than you reckon."

"How?"

"Don't ask me."


CHAPTER XXXV

One speaks of the moods of spring, but the days that are her true children have only one mood; they are all full of the rising and dropping of winds, and the whistling of birds. New flowers may come out, the green embroidery of the hedges increase, but the same heaven broods overhead, soft, thick, and blue, the same figures,

-285-

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Howards End
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 6
  • Chapter III 13
  • Chapter IV 23
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 45
  • Chapter VII 56
  • Chapter VIII 64
  • Chapter IX 73
  • Chapter X 79
  • Chapter XI 87
  • Chapter XII 102
  • Chapter XIII 107
  • Chapter XIV 115
  • Chapter XV 125
  • Chapter XVI 137
  • Chapter XVII 149
  • Chapter XVIII 157
  • Chapter XIX 167
  • Chapter XX 176
  • Chapter XXI 184
  • Chapter XXII 186
  • Chapter XXIII 193
  • Chapter XXIV 202
  • Chapter XXV 207
  • Chapter XXVI 217
  • Chapter XXVII 233
  • Chapter XXVIII 240
  • Chapter XXIX 244
  • Chapter XXX 250
  • Chapter XXXI 257
  • Chapter XXXII 262
  • Chapter XXXIII 266
  • Chapter XXXIV 276
  • Chapter XXXV 285
  • Chapter XXXVI 289
  • Chapter XXXVII 292
  • Chapter XXXVIII 303
  • Chapter Xxxix 309
  • Chapter XL 311
  • Chapter XLI 315
  • Chapter XLII 325
  • Chapter XLIII 329
  • Chapter XLIV 335
  • About the Author *
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