Seventeen

By Booth Tarkington; Arthur William Brown | Go to book overview

VIII
JANE

WILLIAM'S period of peculiar sensitiveness dated from that evening, and Jane, in particular, caused him a great deal of anxiety. In fact, he began to feel that Jane was a mortification which his parents might have spared him, with no loss to themselves or to the world. Not having shown that consideration for anybody, they might at least have been less spinelessly indulgent of her. William's bitter conviction was that he had never seen a child so starved of discipline or so lost to etiquette as Jane.

For one thing, her passion for bread-and-butter, covered with apple sauce and powdered sugar, was getting to be a serious matter. Secretly, William was not yet so changed by love as to be wholly indifferent to this refection himself, but his consumption of it was private, whereas Jane had formed the habit of eating it in exposed places -- such as the front yard or the sidewalk. At no hour of the day was it advisable for a relative to approach the neighborhood in fastidious

-45-

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Seventeen
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Seventeen 1
  • II - The Unknown 5
  • III - The Painful Age 13
  • IV - Genesis and Clematis 21
  • V - Sorrows Within a Boiler 28
  • VI - Truculence 36
  • VII - Mr. Baxter's Evening Clothes 41
  • VIII - Jane 45
  • IX - Little Sisters Have Big Ears 58
  • X - Mr. Parcher and Love 64
  • XI - Beginning a True Friendship 77
  • XII - Progress of the Symptoms 88
  • XIII - At Home to His Friends 104
  • XIV - Time Does Fly 113
  • XV - Romance of Statistics 126
  • XVI - The Shower 138
  • XVII - Jane's Theory 149
  • XVIII - The Big, Fat Lummox 163
  • XIX - "I Dunno Why It Is" 174
  • XX - Sydney Carton 182
  • XXI - My Little Sweethearts 191
  • XXII - Foreshadowings 203
  • XXIII - Fathers Forget 217
  • XXIV - Clothes Make the Man 230
  • XXV - Youth and Mr. Parcher 247
  • XXVI - Miss Boke 258
  • XXVII - Marooned 273
  • XXVIII - Rannie Kirsted 286
  • XXIX - "Don't Forget!" 299
  • XXX - The Bride-To-Be 319
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