Seventeen

By Booth Tarkington; Arthur William Brown | Go to book overview

XI
BEGINNING A TRUE FRIENDSHIP

THIS was Miss Jane Baxter. She opened her eyes upon the new-born day, and her first thoughts were of Mr. Parcher. That is, he was already in her mind when she awoke, a circumstance to be accounted for on the ground that his conversation, during her quiet convalescence in his library, had so fascinated her that in all likelihood she had been dreaming of him. Then, too, Jane and Mr. Parcher had a bond in common, though Mr. Parcher did not know it. Not without result had William repeated Miss Pratt's inquiry in Jane's hearing: "Who is that curious child?" Jane had preserved her sang-froid, but the words remained with her, for she was one of those who ponder and retain in silence.

She thought almost exclusively of Mr. Parcher until breakfast-time, and resumed her thinking of him at intervals during the morning. Then, in the afternoon, a series of quiet events not unconnected with William's passion caused her to think of Mr. Parcher more poignantly than ever;

-77-

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Seventeen
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Seventeen 1
  • II - The Unknown 5
  • III - The Painful Age 13
  • IV - Genesis and Clematis 21
  • V - Sorrows Within a Boiler 28
  • VI - Truculence 36
  • VII - Mr. Baxter's Evening Clothes 41
  • VIII - Jane 45
  • IX - Little Sisters Have Big Ears 58
  • X - Mr. Parcher and Love 64
  • XI - Beginning a True Friendship 77
  • XII - Progress of the Symptoms 88
  • XIII - At Home to His Friends 104
  • XIV - Time Does Fly 113
  • XV - Romance of Statistics 126
  • XVI - The Shower 138
  • XVII - Jane's Theory 149
  • XVIII - The Big, Fat Lummox 163
  • XIX - "I Dunno Why It Is" 174
  • XX - Sydney Carton 182
  • XXI - My Little Sweethearts 191
  • XXII - Foreshadowings 203
  • XXIII - Fathers Forget 217
  • XXIV - Clothes Make the Man 230
  • XXV - Youth and Mr. Parcher 247
  • XXVI - Miss Boke 258
  • XXVII - Marooned 273
  • XXVIII - Rannie Kirsted 286
  • XXIX - "Don't Forget!" 299
  • XXX - The Bride-To-Be 319
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