A Commentary on Livy, Books VI-X - Vol. 1

By S. P. Oakley | Go to book overview

Historical Introduction
Livy wrote annalistically, following a tradition which went back through his Latin sources to Thucydides and Xenophon; but the many historical problems posed by book vi are not easily bounded by the ends of years, and in discussion of them it is preferable to follow a different arrangement. Therefore, although there are numerous notes in the commentary proper which examine points of detail (note especially 11. 1-20. 16 on Manlius Capitolinus and 34. 1-42. 14 on the Licinio-Sextian rogations), the main historical themes of the book are expounded as follows in this Introduction:
Rome and her neighbours 389-367 BC
Before 389: Rome and the Latin league
The effect of the Gallic Sack
Rome and Etruria
Rome and the Volsci and Aequi
Rome and the Latins
Gallic attacks on Rome between the Allia and Sentinum
The Struggle of the Orders
Camillus

ROME AND HER NEIGHBOURS 389-367 BC

Before 389: Rome and the Latin league.

Livy's account of Roman history in book vi cannot be understood without assessing the nature of the alliance between Rome and the Latins following the foedus Cassianum. As the subject is large and has been treated perceptively by several scholars,1 this account may

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1
There is a massive bibliography on the subject, from which I here select. The most helpful introductions are perhaps Petzold ( 1972), Sherwin-White ( 1973) 3-37 (first published in 1939 and the best of the older works), and Cornell ( 1989) 243-308 (to which I owe much; see also Cornell [ 1995] 293-326); much useful material, however, is assembled in little space by M. Gelzer, RE s.u. 'Latium' xii. 940-63. Alföldi ( 1965) is highly stimulating but often unreliable (see e.g. the review of Momigliano [ 1965] 19-22 = [ 1977] 99-105); in particular his views are vitiated by a failure to accept the true size and power of Romec. 500. The other recent book on the subject, Bernardi ( 1973), displays less originality but is more orthodox and reliable. Beloch ( 1926: 144-215) treated these problems with his customary blend of magiste-

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A Commentary on Livy, Books VI-X - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Figures xiv
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Book VI 329
  • Historical Introduction 331
  • Commentary 381
  • Appendices 725
  • Bibliography 735
  • Indexes 769
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