The Centennial Celebrations of the State of New York: Prepared Pursuant to a Concurrent Resolution of the Legislature of 1878, and Chapter 391 of the Laws of 1879

By Allen Beach | Go to book overview

APPENDIX TO "THE OLD CAPITOL."

NOTE 1. THE ARMS OF THE STATE.

The arms of the State have never been placed there, possibly because there remains to the present day uncertainty as to what is the actual design of the State arms. Dr. HENRY A. HOMES, State Librarian, writes as follows on the subject:

"The first enacted general law of the State of New York, March 16, 1778, declared what were to be the arms and seal of the State.* Several times since, in 1798, 1801, 1809, and 1813, new seals or modifications of the old seals have been authorized by law, but there is no evidence that the arms of the State were ever changed by law.

"The following is a general description of the arms, avoiding technical terms: Shield -- Upper portion a blue sky, with the sun rising behind three mountains, and at the base of the last the sea in calm. Crest -- An eagle rising from a globe, with geographical delineations. Supporters -- The figure of Liberty, in dress of gold and mantle of red hanging behind from her shoulders to her feet, the right hand clasping a staff, crowned with a liberty cap, and her left pressing upon a jewelled crown. This is on the right. On the left, the figure of Justice, with dress and mantle like those of Liberty, her left hand holding a balance, and a sword pointed upward in her right hand. Both of these figures are standing, and the left hand of Liberty supports the shield.

"Efforts are being made in the Secretary of State's office to secure correct pictures of the arms in their earliest form. There has been obtained an engraving of the arms as found on a military commission issued by Governor George Clinton within three months after the passage of the law of 1778. There is now painting in colors a copy of the arms from a flag displayed by a New York regiment, commanded by Gen. Gansevoort at the surrender of Gen. Cornwallis at Yorktown in 1781, to be placed in the State Library, and in the Secretary's office. By chap. 634 of the Laws of 1875, a third early copy of the arms has been obtained from a window in St. Paul's church, New York. With the aid of all these a standard representation of the State arms will be retained in the Secretary's office.

"The title pages of the annual editions of the Session Laws, down to 1815, bore a vignette of the State arms, of the same general design as the three early copies mentioned above; but in that year, for the first time, the vignette bore the figure of Justice seated, and in 1819 the figure of Liberty was also, for the first time, seated. Evidently it was supposed that as the seals had been modified, the laws of heraldry, as regards the arms, might be disregarded and the supporters be seated."


No. 2.

The following extracts from the minutes of the Common Council of Albany, relative to the sun-dial, have been brought to the attention of the editor by Mr. ELISHA MACK, of Albany, and will be found of interest:

____________________
*
Greenleaf ed., vol. 1, ch. 12.

-400-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Centennial Celebrations of the State of New York: Prepared Pursuant to a Concurrent Resolution of the Legislature of 1878, and Chapter 391 of the Laws of 1879
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • List of Illustrations v
  • Introductory. 1
  • Kingston. 23
  • Oriskany. 55
  • Bemus Heights. 151
  • Ceremonies at the Old Fort in Schoharie. 197
  • Appendix To Grenville Tremain's Address. 218
  • Appendix To Governor Seymour's Speech. 354
  • Cherry Valley. 357
  • The Old Capitol 385
  • Appendix to "The Old Capitol." 400
  • The New Capitol. 403
  • Occupation of the New Capitol. 421
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 459

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.