Andrew Carnegie Centenary, 1835-1935: The Memorial Address by Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, and Other Tributes to the Memory of Andrew Carnegie

By Carnegie Corporation of New York | Go to book overview

FROM ANDREW CARNEGIE'S BIRTHPLACE

THE EARL OF ELGIN AND KINCARDINE

DR. FINLEY and I are standing in a little three-room cottage in Dunfermline. Dunfermline is a town of some 35,000 inhabitants; in the county of Fife, situated about four and one-half miles north of the Forth Bridge and sixteen miles from Edinburgh; but although it is not a large city, it has an important place in Scottish history. As the ancient capital of Scotland, it was favored by many Scottish kings, and in the royal palace here Malcolm III and his saintly Queen Margaret held their court from 1070 to 1093, as did in fact nearly all our Scottish kings up to the time of James VI whose son, afterwards Charles I of England and Scotland, was born in the palace here in 1590; that is, three years before the union of the crowns. In the Abbey close beside the palace are buried Malcolm Canmore and his queen with their four sons, Prince Edward, King Edgar, Alexander I and David I; Malcolm IV; Alexander III; and finally Robert the Bruce and his queen, Elizabeth.

Dunfermline is also interesting in history as being the home of linen weaving in Scotland. Commencing early in the eighteenth century with the coarse fabric known as "huckaback," handlooms for the weaving of single and

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Addresses delivered on November 24, and broadcast in America from the cottage in Dunfirmline, Scotland, where Andrew Carnegie was born.

-13-

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Andrew Carnegie Centenary, 1835-1935: The Memorial Address by Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, and Other Tributes to the Memory of Andrew Carnegie
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • From Andrew Carnegie's Birthplace 13
  • Address 16
  • Address John H. Finley 19
  • Recollections of Andrew Carnegie 25
  • Presiding Officer's Address 30
  • Andrew Carnegie the Memorial Address 34
  • In Memory of Andrew Carnegie 52
  • Andrew Carnegie as Founder 61
  • Andrew Carnegie as Patron of Learning 78
  • In Memory of Andrew Carnegie 93
  • In Appreciation 94
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