A History of the Great War, 1914-1918

By C. R. M. F. Cruttwell | Go to book overview

XXVIII CAMBRAI

THE battle which so dramatically concluded this weary year of deferred hope was the most original and interesting of the war, and had ultimately by far the most important consequences. In the first place it regained the seemingly lost art of surprise, and both sides hereafter clung desperately to this secret of decision.1 Secondly, it signalized the correct tactical employment of the new arm, which till now had been so pitiably wasted contrary to the direct advice of its chief begetter, Swinton. The triumphant power of a massed onslaught of tanks, suddenly at a stroke without artillery assistance, to break clean through the strongest field fortifications, profoundly changed the character of trench-warfare. It was no longer possible to affix the label 'active' or 'quiet' to different parts of the front. Tired or inferior divisions could no longer be sent to a 'safe' area with any comfortable certainty that ample time would be available for their relief before an attack could be mounted. The mystery of the new tactics was indeed most improvidently revealed at a moment when, as Haig himself admits, the means at his disposal in November 1917 permitted no more than a gambler's blow. Yet fortune proved unusually forgiving. Labour shortage and the prior demands for other kinds of war-material made it impossible for the enemy to exploit this weapon for his own attacks in 1918.2 Moreover, immediately after this battle the initiative passed to the Germans. The whole energy of their best minds was concentrated on a peace- compelling offensive with the old weapons. In consequence, no counter-measures against the tanks were

____________________
1
See the memorandum of December 14, circulated by Prince Rupprecht's Staff, which contains the phrase 'Misslingt die Überraschung, so misslingt auch der Durchbruch', as the principal lesson to be learnt from Cambrai ( Kronprinz Rupprecht, Mein Kriegstagebuch ( 1929), vol. iii, p. 193).
2
See H. von Kuhl, Weltkrieg ( 1930), vol. ii, p. 235, In 1918 the Germans used 90 tanks, 75 of which were captured from their enemy, while only 15 were of home construction.

-467-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of the Great War, 1914-1918
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 654

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.