A History of the Great War, 1914-1918

By C. R. M. F. Cruttwell | Go to book overview

APPENDIX ON CASUALTIES

THE total number of casualties suffered in the war will never be accurately known. Some countries, as Russia, Turkey, and Serbia, kept very imperfect statistical records. In France the total number of wounded has never been published. In Germany the lightly wounded remaining with their units were not included in the casualty lists. In order therefore to make an exact comparison with the British figures it would be necessary to add about 25 per cent. to the number of the German wounded. In many countries the proportion between missing and prisoners remains quite uncertain, owing to the revolutions, and changes in political boundaries which succeeded the war.

It is generally supposed that the total military and naval deaths amount to between ten and thirteen millions. One authority1 reckons as follows:

Known Deaths 10,004,771
Presumed Deaths 2,991,800
12,996,571

This total includes deaths from disease, as far as they were separately recorded from those of the civil population, as well as deaths in action.

Some detailed figures of the losses of the principal belligerents now follow.


I. BRITISH EMPIRE (including INDIA)

Total Enlistments 9,496, 170. Total Deaths 947,023.

Total Wounded 2,121,906. Total Prisoners of War 191,652.

Grand Total 3,260,5812

Of this total the following proportion came from Great Britain and Ireland.

Total Enlistments 6,211,427. Total Deaths 744,702.

Total Wounded 1,693,262. Total Prisoners of War 170,389.

Grand Total 2,618,353

____________________
1
E. L. Bogart, Direct and Indirect Costs of the Great World War ( 1920).
2
Hansard Parliamentary Debates, May 5, 1921.

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