The Threat of Soviet Imperialism

By C. Grove Haines; Johns Hopkins University. School of Advanced International Studies | Go to book overview

Foreword

In August, 1953, the School of Advanced International Studies sponsored a conference in Washington on "The Problem of Soviet Imperialism." This was closely integrated with the School's special graduate Summer Session on the same general topic and, like the conference on "Southeast Asia in the Coming World," which was similarly arranged the preceding summer, was designed to bring together eminent members of the scholarly professions as well as government and business personnel most deeply concerned with the question. The roster of speakers and discussion leaders, to be found in the table of contents, provides a general indication of the broad representation which was achieved, both functionally and geographically. Because of limitations of space, registration at the conference was restricted to 450, most of whom were in regular attendance throughout the five days of its duration. The present volume is the product of that conference.

Although the threat of Soviet imperialism has become increasingly serious over the years, those of us who laid plans for the conference could not have guessed initially how very timely the topic would be. Our preliminary announcements coincided with Stalin's death and the beginnings of what seemed to many to be a genuine relaxation of Soviet aggressiveness abroad and of the stern dictatorship at home. The succeeding months were filled with rumors of internal discords and speculation as to the role and intentions of the new Malenkov regime. By the time the conference assembled, that regime had already been put to some rigorous tests and it was possible to begin reviewing its role objectively and in historical perspective. It was not our purpose to concentrate upon the present dictatorship as such, yet I think it may be said that this volume does provide the kind of authoritative analysis which is required if a reasonable assessment of its place in the contemporary international scene is to be made.

The plan of the book follows in nearly every detail the plan

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Threat of Soviet Imperialism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.