From Dreyfus to Petain: The Struggle of a Republic

By Wilhelm Herzog; Walter Sorell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2

SIX PHASES OF THE DREYFUS AFFAIR

THE Dreyfus Affair may be considered from six angles:

First, as a mystery novel, more thrilling, more fantastic, more sensational than any famous detective story.

Second, as the moving, pathetic story of a Jewish family.

Third, as a contest between the military and civil authorities of an unstable republic; a controversy between republicans and all the enemies of the republic, intensified to the point of civil war on behalf of justice against power.

Fourth, as the heroic period of the Third Republic.

Fifth, as the experience of an entire generation; the intellectual and temporal history of France at the turn of the century; the eternal battle for the right.

Sixth, as the stupendous material for a Comédie Humaine.


(I)

THE MYSTERY NOVEL

The cleverest, the most intricately constructed detective story cannot compete with the simple statement of facts documenting the scenes that took place in Paris at the turn of the century. The inventions of the mystery writer seem artificial and commonplace compared with the actual happenings in that metropolis. And the locale of these events was not the haunts of criminals but the most respectable and socially most acceptable surroundings. They took place in the Rue St. Dominique, in the Headquarters of the General Staff of the French army, in the German Embassy, in the Rue de Lille, in the Elysée, in the palace of the President of the Republic, in the ministries, in the chambers of the courts-martial, in the jury rooms of the Palace of Justice, in the public places of Paris, on the Esplanade des Invalides, in the Parc Montsouris, and in the Bourbon Palace.

High-ranking officers with false beards and dark glasses, bundled

-4-

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From Dreyfus to Petain: The Struggle of a Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I - A Struggle of Dauntless Courage 1
  • Chapter 2 - Six Phases of the Dreyfus Affair 4
  • Chapter 3 - French Nationalism and the Catholic Church 18
  • Chapter 4 - French Anti-Semitism at the Turn of the Century 25
  • Chapter - Captain Alfred Dreyfus 59
  • Chapter 6 - The Generals of the Republic 65
  • Chapter 7 - The Alarmed Bourgeoisie 79
  • Chapter 8 - Clemenceau 85
  • Chapter 9 - Zola: His Background 111
  • Chapter 10 - Zola as a Fighter 120
  • Chapter 11 - Zola on Trial 137
  • Chapter 12 - Zola in Exile 151
  • Chapter 13 - Jaures 160
  • Chapter 14 - Picquart 176
  • Chapter 15 - Esterhazy 197
  • Chapter 16 - Von Schwartzkoppen 220
  • Chapter 17 - The German Side of the Affair 227
  • Chapter 18 - The Struggle Never Ends 254
  • Bibliography 301
  • Index 307
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